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THE HIGHWAY 80 PROJECT California Fun Facts

1. From Route 101 near Division Street in San Francisco to Route 280 near First Street in San Francisco. Approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947; deleted as chargeable interstate in August 1965. Until 1968, part (1) began at I-280 (present-day Route 1). In 1968, the portion from I-280 (present-day Route 1) to US 101 (LRN 223) was transferred to Route 241. This was originally part of a much longer route, and would have formed the handle of the "Panhandle" Freeway. Additional history on the planned freeways for the San Francisco Bay area can be found here. Before 1968, maps indicate that I-80 was routed on the Central Freeway, and was cosigned with US 101 up to Fell Street. This segment was originally cosigned as US 40/US 50, dating back to the signage of US highways. It was LRN 68, defined in 1923. This segment was part of the Lincoln Highway, which originally terminated in Lincoln Park, six miles west of the ferry landing at the foot of Market Street. The Lincoln Highway ended opposite the Palace of the Legion of Honor at a small monument marking the spot. The last few miles (of the highway) were California Street. This segment of I-80 is named the "James Lick" Skyway. The entire route in California has been submitted to be part of the National Purple Heart Trail. The Military Order of the Purple Heart is working to establish a national commemorative trail for recipients of the Purple Heart medal, which honors veterans who were wounded in combat. All states in the union will designate highways for inclusion in the commemorative trail, and all of the designated highways will be interconnected to form the National Purple Heart Trail. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 14, Resolution Chapter 79, July 10, 2001. It is unclear how this segment is presently signed. It may be signed as US 101, it may be unsigned, it may be signed as "TO" I-80, or it may be (mistakenly) signed as I-80. There appear to be some plans to make a portion of the originally planned freeway routing in San Francisco (which is mostly unbuilt) inno an underground tollway. The San Francisco Chronicle published an article on 2/18/2001 where it indicated that transportation planners "said the city should look into building ``supercorridor'' roads under Van Ness Avenue, 19th Avenue, and Fell and Oak streets." The suggested 19th Avenue tunnel would run five miles, from Junipero Serra Boulevard through Golden Gate Park and up to Lake Street, with exits at Brotherhood Way, Ocean Avenue, Quintara Street, Lincoln Way and Geary Boulevard. The Van Ness tunnel would run almost two miles, from about Fell to Lombard Street, with exits at Broadway and Geary Boulevard. Along Oak and Fell, the planners suggest an underground road running more than half a mile from Laguna to Divisadero streets. However, the roads would would violate the long-standing general plan for San Francisco, which calls for no new highway capacity. Freeways of San Francisco. Chris Sampang's site gives a lot of information about proposals for this route in the San Francisco area, including exit lists with hypothetical connections. This includes subpages on the James Lick, San Francisco Skyway, and Western freeways. 2. From Route 280 near First Street in San Francisco to the Nevada state line near Verdi, Nevada, passing near Oakland, via Albany, via Sacramento, passing near Roseville, via Auburn, via Emigrant Gap, via Truckee and via the Truckee River Canyon. The California Transportion Commission, in September 2000, considered a Traffic Congestion Relief Program proposal to reconstruct the I-80/I-680/Route 12 interchange; it would be a 12-interchange complext constructed in seven stages. The proposal was $1 million for stage 1; the total estimated cost was $13 million. Sacramento: The Capitol City Freeway, consisting of portions of US 50 and unsigned Route 51. Truckee: Donner Pass Road (old US 40) and Route 267. Approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947, with a routing through Sacramento that followed what is now US 50 (the unsigned I-305 portion) to the Route 99/US 50 interchange, and then what is designated as Business 80 (Unsigned Route 51) north to the point where it rejoins I-80. The current routing of I-80 between the US 50/I-80 interchange and the Business Route 80 (Route 51)/I-80 interchange was originally designated at I-880 and was approved as chargeable interstate in July of 1958. I-305 was approved as chargeable interstate in May 1980; at the same time, the business route portion was removed from the interstate system. I-305 is currently signed as US 50. At one time, Caltrans proposed that I-80 be numbered as I-76. In Sacramento, this route (at times) was to have been Route 880. Here is the history related to that numbering: 1964. I-80 first appears in Sacramento, using the old US 40/US 99E joint section of freeway and a portion of the US 99E freeway (this latter portion is the former Elvas Freeway, a brief history of which is found under Route 51). 1965. A plan is put forth to bypass the existing I-80 with a new alignment that would run in the median of I-880 in a dual freeway design from the I-80/I-880 split northeast of Sacarmento. The alignment would then separate onto the new alignment parallel to the Southern Pacific Railroad mainline to just south of the American River, where it would rejoin the existing I-80. A dual freeway design would have then been used to the north end of Downtown Sacramento. The realignment was needed because the existing I-80 alignment did not meet Interstate standards. A 1969 map shows this as under construction for I-880, with a portion parallel to I-80 (present Business Route 50) along Roseville Road, Auburn Blvd, and continuing across the American River. It appears a portion of this was constructed between Del Paso Park and near Catskill Way; it is unclear what this is today. 1972. I-880 (present-day I-80) was completed; I-80 in the median was completed but was not opened to traffic, ending at a long viaduct to nowhere just south of where it left then I-880. Note: The I-880 numbering actually makes sense, and the route would have connected with Route 244 (never constructed) and then with Route 143, forming a loop back to US 50. It would have continued as Route 244, and continued to Route 65. 1979. The Sacramento City Council voted to delete the new I-80 alignment and use the funding and right-of-way for rail transit. 1980. The new alignment was withdrawn from the Interstate system. The need for route continuity for I-80 means that I-880 was redesignated I-80. The portion of I-80 from the end of the new alignment south of the American River to Highway 99 was classified as FAP (Federal Aid Primary) 51 (present-day Route 51). The portion of I-80 west of Route 99 to the former I-80/I-880 junction in West Sacramento is kept in the interstate system and classified as FAI (Federal-aid Interstate) 305 (briefly I-305, part of present-day US 50). No signage changes take place because the changes have not been made in the state highway system. 1981. The 1980 FHWA action made no change to FAU (Federal-aid Urban) 6380 (the old I-80 alignment) other than reclassifying it as part of FAP 51. State Senate Bill 191 makes changes in the state highway system refelcting the FHWA actions. I-880 is deleted and I-80 is rerouted over it. The FAP 51 segment of the old I-80 alignment is officially numbered as Route 51. The FAI 305 segment was designated as an extension of US 50. All of the old I-80 alignment was signed as Business Loop 80. FAI 305 was never signed as I-305, but its interstate designation remains today. 1982. Signage changes are completed. 1983. Caltrans asks FHWA to renumber Route 17 from San Jose to Oakland as I-880. FHWA classifies the route as FAP 880. Other changes made include signing the freeway portion of Route 238 as I-238 and extending I-580 over I-880. No signage change takes place because the changes have not been made in the state highway system. 1984. State Assembly Bill 2741 renumbers Route 17 from San Jose to Oakland as I-880, as well as extending I-580. 1985. The new signage of the routes affected by AB 2471 is completed. 1987. RT Metro light rail opens in Sacramento, using the completed portions of the attempted I-80 realignment, as well as much of its right-of-way. 1996. Business Route 80 in Sacramento is officially named Capital City Freeway, though no changes are made to state route numbers, federal classifications, or the Business Loop designation. The new name is posted at several locations. This segment of the route was originally signed as follows: 1. As cosigned US 40/US 50 between San Franciso and Emeryville (current I-80/I-880 junction). This was LRN 68. This was mostly defined in 1923; the Bay Bridge was added in 1929. 2. As US 40/Route 17 between Oakland (I-80/I-880 junction) and Richmond (former Route 17/US 40 junction, near the present I-580/I-80 junction). This was LRN 14, defined in 1909. The surface routing is now Route 123. This was bypassed by LRN 69, in 1923. 3. As US 40 from near El Cerrito and 2 mi SW of Davis (junction Alt US 40/US 99W; now Route 113). This was signed as US 40; it is present-day I-80. This was LRN 7, defined in 1909. 4. As cosigned US 40/US 99W between Davis and Sacramento. This was LRN 6, defined in 1909. 5. As cosigned US 40/US 50/US 99E between Sacramento and Roseville. This was LRN 3, defined in 1909. 6. The freeway routing N of Sacramento did not exist before 1963, but was proposed LRN 242, defined in 1957. 7. As US 40 between Sacramento and Auburn. This was LRN 17, defined in 1909. 8. As US 40 between Auburn and Truckee. This was LRN 37, defined in 1919. 9. As US 40 between Truckee and the Nevada state line. This was LRN 38, defined in 1923. The segment of US 40 (present-day I-80) between Reno and Sacramento was part of the Lincoln Highway. There was also an Alternate US 40, also signed (apparently) in the mid-1930s. This ran N from 2 mi SW of Davis along present-day Route 113 to near Tudor (LRN 7 between US 40 and Route 16; LRN 87 between Route 16 and Tudor); then along present-day Route 70 between Marysville and US 395 (LRN 87 between Marysville and Oroville; LRN 21 between Oroville and US 395). It was cosigned with US 395 into Reno, NV. The portion of part (2) of I-80 in San Francisco is named the "James Lick" Skyway. The entire route in California has been submitted to be part of the National Purple Heart Trail. The Military Order of the Purple Heart is working to establish a national commemorative trail for recipients of the Purple Heart medal, which honors veterans who were wounded in combat. All states in the union will designate highways for inclusion in the commemorative trail, and all of the designated highways will be interconnected to form the National Purple Heart Trail. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 14, Resolution Chapter 79, July 10, 2001. The portion of I-80 from the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge through Richmond is named the "East Shore" Freeway. This section of freeway was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 99, Chapt. 229 in 1968. The portion of I-80 from the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge through Alameda County to the Contra Costa County Line is named the "Kent D. Pursel Memorial Freeway". Mr. Pursel was a Berkeley druggist and councilman. This should not be confused with Charles Purcell who oversaw the construction of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 99, Chapter 229 in 1968. The eastbound I-80/Route 37 interchange is named the "Gary L. Hughes Memorial Interchange". Officer Hughes was a CHP officer killed in the line of duty by a drunk driver during a traffic stop near the bridge. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Chapter 124, in 1998. I-80 from Route 4 to the Carquinez Bridge in Contra Costa County is named the "Linus F. Claeys" Freeway. Linus Claeys was a local landowner, businessman and philanthropist. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 85, Chapter 80 in 1990. The Carquinez Bridge was purchased in 1940. Tolls were eliminated in 1945. The parallel structure was opened in 1958. Tolls were reinstated at that time. The westbound span of the Carquinez Bridge is named the "Alfred Zampa Memorial Bridge" in honor and recognition of Alfred "Al" Zampa. Alfred "Al" Zampa was born on March 12, 1905, in Selby, California. After graduating from high school, Al Zampa went into business and became the owner of a meat market in Crockett, California until about 1924, when a customer asked him if he wanted to go to work for that customer on the bridge they were building from Crockett to Vallejo. Al Zampa decided to give it a try; and the first Carquinez Bridge opened in May of 1927, in part due to Al Zampa's efforts. That bridge was to be the first of many bridges Al Zampa would work on in his illustrious career as an iron worker. Al Zampa continued working with the company that built the Carquinez Bridge and worked on projects and bridges in Stockton, California and later in Arizona and Texas, returning to California in the early 1930's to work on the Oakland-San Francisco Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate Bridge. On October 20, 1936, this outstanding iron worker fell into the safety net while working on the Golden Gate Bridge and broke four vertebrae in his back. He later returned to iron work and worked on the second Carquinez Bridge in the 1950's with his two sons, Richard L. (Dick) and Gene. Al Zampa also worked on the Martinez Bridge and the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge and continued to work as a respected iron worker until he retired at the age of 65. In 1987, he was the subject of a stage play entitled "The Ace" that was performed at Fort Mason in San Francisco. Al Zampa was also interviewed for the History Channel on top of the building of the Golden Gate Bridge and more recently for a new show entitled "Suicide Missions: Skywalkers" which depicts the history of the Iron Worker Union. Al Zampa passed away on April 23, 2000, at the age of 95. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 97, Chapter 135, September 12, 2000. The portion of I-80 that passes through Vallejo, from the Carquinez Bridge to Columbus Parkway, is named the "Jeffrey Lynn Azuar Memorial Highway". Jeffrey Lynn Azuar was a Vallejo Police Officer who was killed in the line of duty on April 12, 2000. He was born and raised in Vallejo and served the community as an officer with the Vallejo Police Department for over 21 years, serving as a patrol officer, a narcotics officer, a member of the SWAT team, a member of the Honor Guard, and a K-9 officer. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 85, Chapter 155, on September 20, 2000. The portion of I-80 W of the intersection with Route 51 (signed as Business 80) in Sacramento is named the "West Sacramento" Freeway. The portion of this route from Sacramento to Route 65 was historically called the "Capitol Highway". The portion of I-80 between the Sacramento county line and the Nevada border is officially named the "Alan S. Hart" Freeway. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 102, Chapter 164, in 1986. The portion of this route between Route 113 in Davis and Route 65 in Roseville (i.e., the portions originally signed as part of US 99) are designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993. The portion of this route that is former US 99 is, in local usage, called the "East Side Highway". The portion of I-80 from Emigrant Gap to Donner Lake was originally named the "Dutch Flat-Donner Lake Wagon Road". This name was specified by Resolution Chapter 224 in 1909. The entire freeway between San Francisco and Nevada is named the "Dwight D. Eisenhower Highway". Dwight Eisenhower was U.S. President from 1952 until 1960. He has been called the father of the Interstate Highway System. Named by the Federal Highway Administration in 1973. Bridge 34-003 over San Francisco Bay is called the "San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge", although it was never formally named. It was opened in 1936, and was to be dedicated to James B. Rolf, although this never occurred. Tunnel 34-004 under San Francisco Bay at the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge is called the "Yerba Buena Tunnel". It was built in 1936. Bridge 23-0015 over the Carquinez Strait between Contra Costa and Solano counties is called the "Carquinez Bridge". It was built in 1927. On this bridge is the "Roger Van Den Broeke Memorial Plaque", named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 105, Chapter 99, in 1994. The Yolo Causeway (including bridges 22-044 and 22-045) on Route 80 in the County of Yolo is officially designated the "Blecher-Freeman Memorial Causeway". Roy P. Blecher and W. Michael Freeman were veteran California Highway Patrol officers shot to death during an enforcement stop on Route 80 near the Yolo Causeway in the early morning hours of December 22, 1978 at the hands of an armed felon. It was built in 1962, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 119, Chapter 147, in 1994. The "Elisha Stephens Historical Plaque" is located at the Donner Lake Overlook, in Nevada County, W of Truckee. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 24, Chapter 76, in 1993. This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas: Hunter Hill, in Solano County, 7 mi. E of Vallejo. Gold Run, in Placer County, near the Sawmill and Gold Run overcrossing. Donner Summit, in Nevada County on Donner Pass. As US 40, the portion of this route between the Nevada border and Sacramento was part of the "Lincoln Highway (Alternate)" (which started in Reno). Additionally, the segment of US 40 between San Francisco and Oakland was part of the "Lincoln Highway", which originally terminated in Lincoln Park, six miles west of the ferry landing at the foot of Market Street. The Lincoln Highway ended opposite the Palace of the Legion of Honor at a small monument marking the spot. The last few miles (of the highway) were California Street. Business Loop 80 in Sacramento (Andy Fields) Finding US 40 (Casey Cooper) Finding US 99 (Casey Cooper) The portion of this route from San Francisco to the Nevada state line (i.e., former US 40) was designated as the "East-West Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947. There are a number of segments of this route that have commuter lanes, or for which commuter lanes are planned: In Solano County, commuter lanes exist on the Carquinez Bride. These require three or more occupants (two for two-seater vehicles), and are in operation between 3:00 PM and 7:00 PM on weekdays. In Alameda County, commuter lanes exist on westbound I-80 between West Grand Avenue and the Maritime on-ramp. Lanes also exist on the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge. These opened in April 1970, require three or more people (two for two-seater vehicles), and are in operation weekdays between 5:00 AM and 10:00 AM, and between 3:00 PM and 6:00 PM. Other lane segments and dates of opening are: Eastbound: Between Cutting Boulevard and Pinole Valley Road (February 1997) Westbound: Between Pinole Valley Road and Cutting Blvd (March 1997) Both directions between Cutting Blvd and Central Ave (May 1997) Eastbound: Between Pinole Valley Road and Route 4 (August 1997) Westbound: Route 4 to Pinole Valley Road (September 1997) Westbound: Central Ave to Bay Bridge Toll Plaza (February 1998) Eastbound: Gilman Street to Central Ave (July 1998) Eastbound: Powell Street to Gilman Ave (November 1998) In Contra Costa County, commuter lanes exist between San Pablo Dame Road and Pinole Valley Road. These opened in February 1997 (EB) and March 1997 (WB), require three or more people, and are in operation weekdays between 5:00 AM and 10:00 AM (westbound), and between 3:00 PM and 7:00 PM (eastbound). Additional lanes are from Pinole Valley Road to Route 4, Eastbound and from Pinole Valley Road to Route 4, Westbound. HOV lanes are planned or under construction as follows: Longview Road overcrossing in Sacramento to the Placer County line. Construction will begin in October 2001. Sacramento County. Long range plans are to have HOV lanes on I-80 from the Placer County line to Route 65. In June 2002, the CTC had on its agenda a proposal to widen Route 80 from five to six lanes to extend HOV lane eastbound from the San Francisco/Oakland Bay Bridge Toll Plaza to Powell St. Cal-NExUS Exit Numbering: Route 80 East Cal-NExUS Exit Numbering: Route 80 West Cal-NExUS Exit Numbering: Business 80 East Cal-NExUS Exit Numbering: Business 80 West Exit Lists: Capitol City Freeway (SPUI) Exit Lists: Capitol City Freeway (Joel Windmiller) [SHC 263.5] From I-280 near First Street in San Francisco to Route 61 in Oakland; and from Route 20 near Emigrant Gap to the Nevada state line near Verdi, Nevada. Interstate 80 (Zzyzx) [SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. [SHC 164.14] Entire route. Overall statistics for I-80: Total Length (1995): 204 miles Average Daily Traffic (1992): 21,500 to 250,000 Milage Classification: Rural: 112; Sm. Urban 5; Urbanized: 87. Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 202 mi; FAP: 2 mi. Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 204 mi. Significant Summits: Donner Summit (7240 ft). Counties Traversed: San Francisco, Alameda, Contra Costa, Napa, Solano, Yolo, Sacramento, Placer, Nevada, Sierra. Before the 1964 signage/legislative route alignment, signed route 80 was US 80, which roughly followed the route of the current I-8. US 80 was first signed as a route in California in 1928. The routing for US 80 began in California near Winterhaven at the Arizona State line, and continued W through Midway Wellls, Holtville, El Centro, Seeley, Dixieland, Plaster City, Jacumba, Boulevard, Paposta, Pine Valley, Guatay, Descanso, El Cajon, and into San Diego. This was LRN 12 (defined in 1909) between San Diego and El Centro, and LRN 27 (defined in 1915) between El Centro and Winterhaven. Note that there is a County Route S80 near El Centro; this is likely a former routing of US 80. There is a plank road just off of the old US 80 routing; this it appears to be actually associated with the earlier Southern National Highway, which created the first all-season southern route across the U.S, between Washington, D.C., and San Diego. The named highway had its origins in the early 1910s, and came into prominence in 1915, predating the Old Spanish Trail by more than eight years. To arouse interest in the Pan-Pacific Exposition of 1915, a cross-country caravan set out from San Diego along the Southern National Highway in November 2, 1915, and reached D.C. in 32 days. US 80 was part of the "Atlantic-Pacific Highway". US 80 was part of the "Old Spanish Trail". This trail essentially followed the alignment of historic Spanish Colonial trails across Florida, Louisiana and Texas, and became the precursor to the present-day east-west route across the southern tier of the US. The early highway, which later became US 80 in California (now I-8), generally followed the Spanish Jornada de la Muerte across the state and terminated in downtown San Diego along Park Boulevard/12 Street, where it intersected with old US 101. US 80 appears to have been part of the "Bankhead Highway", the "Dixie Overland Highway", the "Lee Highway", and the "Lone Star Trail". Casey Cooper's Finding US 80 Andrew Field's Historic U.S. 80 Before the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment, LRN 80 was defined as the following route: 1. From LRN 2 (US 101) near Santa Barbara to LRN 2 (US 101 near Zaca) via San Marcos Pass. The portion between Zaca and Santa Ynez is present-day Route 154; it was not signed before 1964. The portion of the route between Santa Ynez and Santa Barbara was part of the original 1934 definition of Route 150; it is present-day Route 154. This segment was defined in 1931. 2. From segment 1 of LRN 80 to LRN 151 (Route 150) near the Ventura-Santa Barbara County line via Foothill Road. This also ran along Laurel Canyon Road, Stanwood Drive, Sycamore Canyon Road, and East Valley Road. This was originally signed as part of Route 150 in 1934; it is present-day Route 192. This segment was defined in 1931. 3. From segment 2 of LRN 80 to LRN 2 (US 101) via Sycamore Canyon. This is present-day Route 144. This segment was defined in 1933, and ran along Milpas, Mason St, Salinas St., and Sycamore Canyon Road.

 


 

 

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Revised: September 08, 2003 .